Crisp Doppelbock

  • Spicy, grainy and slightly earthy
  • ABV 7.7
  • IBU 23
  • OG 1072 SG

The Doppelbock beer has a subtle spicy aroma with some fruity notes from the yeast, the taste is also spicy, grainy and slightly earthy. The beer is vibrant and refreshing and goes down easily leaving you wanting more.

BASICS

BATCH SIZE (LITRES):

163.6

BATCH SIZE (UK BARRELS):

10

ORIGINAL GRAVITY:

1072 SG

FINAL GRAVITY:

12 SG

IBUs:

23

COLOUR (EBC/SRM):

100/50

BREWHOUSE EFFICIENCY:

70%

METHODS / TIMINGS

TEMPERATURES

MASH TEMP:

63°C / 145.4°F

COLLECTION TEMP:

20°C / 68°F

FERMENTATION TEMP:

24°C / 65.2°F

MASH LIQUOR VOL (LITRES):

1269

LIQUOR / MASH RATIO:

2.3 : 1

TIMINGS

MASH:

90 mins

BOIL:

60 mins

INGREDIENTS

MALTS(kg)%

HANA

303.06

56

DARK MUNICH

164.3

30

ROAST BARLEY

5.91

1

CRYSTAL 150

30.37

5

CARA GOLD

29.87

5

DEXTRIN

16.82

3

YEAST

S23

HOPS(g)Contribution%Alpha Acid%Addition

HALLERTAUER TAURUS

1200

19

16.2

Start of Boil

HOPS

HALLERTAUER TAURUS

(g)

1200

Contribution%

19

Alpha Acid%

16.2

Addition

Start of Boil

Malts used in this Recipe

Hana´ Malt

Hana´ is where this barley originated, the Hana valley in Czech Moravia. It was used to produce the very first Pilsner beers back in the 1840s in Bohemia and became the progenitor for the vast majority of successful lager barley varieties to this day.

It brings that perfect bready, crisp continental flavour to all lager types, especially Pilsners and Helles beers. Its malting character is like a continental variety so treat it as such in the brewhouse with a step temperature programme to solubilise the higher protein content. This will promote fantastic head retention. Hana´ is exceptionally pale in colour. 

Find out more here.

Dark Munich Malt

A magical thing happens when amino acids and reducing sugars combine at critical temperatures; the Maillard reaction. Starting with higher protein spring barley we germinate to higher levels of modification then adjust early kilning conditions to utilise the malt enzymes to hydrolyse protein and convert starch in sugars.

Finally, a long drying phase with a higher temperature results in the Maillard reaction taking place to produce pronounced rich malt, freshly baked bread crust and the characteristic Munich bite at the back of the palate.

*Up to 100% (lower DP and extract than Light Munich so at 100% less speciality malt can be added).

Find out more here.

Roast Barley Malt

Roast Barley is our darkest grain and it is made from unmalted barley. The colour produced can be almost opaque and the flavour is similar to a dark, bitter roast coffee. In stouts a combination of Chocolate, Black Malt and Roast Barley gives excellent complexity and balance.

Remember that these dark grains will have an acidifying effect on the mash, so ensure your salts have been adjusted adequately. 

Find out more here.

Light Crystal Malt

To make Light Crystal we increase the temperature further and the endosperm darkens and flavours develop further. Think of Crystal Malts like you would make caramel at home. With Light Crystal the crystalised sugars present imparts an intense caramel flavour. Light Crystal will also impart a reddish hue to the beer and it works very well in Bitters and Ruby beers. 

The number after the word Crystal refers to the EBC colour of the malt if you mashed at 100% of the grain bill. To get a rough conversion to Lovibond, just divide by two. 

Find out more here.

Cara Gold Malt

Cara Gold Malt is the lowest colour of the crystallised malts. Cara Gold yields fruity, and toffee flavour notes that are carried through to the beer.

This low malt colour produces a golden orange lager with increased body and fullness and a softer, rounder mouthfeel with improved drinkability.

Find out more here.

Dextrin Malt

Dextrin Malt is produced by constraining the germination phase, which results in retention of higher molecular weight polysaccharides which will provide positive attributes to the finished beer in terms of greater body and mouthfeel. These dextrins will contribute positively to head formation.

This malt can be particularly beneficial when brewing with well modified Extra Pale Malt to produce golden ales or pilsner-style beers. The low colour permits usage rates of up to 15% without impacting on final product colour. It can be useful in a low gravity beer such as a session IPA that is trying to emulate a higher gravity beer in terms of body.

Find out more here.

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